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Our Churches

Select a church from the list below:

Market Bosworth Churches
All Saints Church - Cadeby

All Saints Church - Cadeby
All Saints' Church, Cadeby, with its distinctive timber-framed, tile-hung tower, dates from the 13th century but became well-known most recently for its connections with the Cadeby Light Railway, under the ministry of the Revd Teddy Boston, who is buried there. This Grade II* listed parish church is opened daily for anyone who wishes to visit.

 

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Carlton

St Andrew’s Church – Carlton
Although the parish registers go back to 1574 the original church building burnt down and a new church with a square tower and pinnacles was built in 1764. The new church was dedicated to St Michael. It is partly built of stone and partly of brick. In 1867 the church building was Gothicised and the dedication was changed from St Michael to St Andrew. The windows were altered and tower with its distinctive saddleback roof was added. The clock was presented to the village in 1937 by the Rectors daughter, who raised the money herself by selling needlework door to door. Carlton ladies needlework tradition continues today with the millennium wall hangings inside the church. These depict the houses in the heart of the village at the beginning of the new millennium.

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St Mary the Virgin Church – Congerstone

St Mary the Virgin Church – Congerstone
The Church is believed to have been built in 1179. It is now a Grade II* lisated building but it is unlikely that any of theoriginal exists today. The oldest parts of the building are the low tower and parts of the nave. The chimney on the roof served the fire in the Howe family box pew.  In 2014 the church supported by the Hertiage Lottery has installed a new stainglass window, and restored the window frame.  Please follow the link to the new church guide. Congerstone Church Guide

 

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St Peter’s Church - Market Bosworth

St Peter’s Church - Market Bosworth
St Peter’s Church is situated in the market town of Market Bosworth . The present buildings date from 14th and 15th centuries. There is stained glass window by Kempe in the south aisle. The Dixie memorials commemorate various members of the family who first came to Bosworth in 1567. The tower houses 8 bells, 2 of which date back to 1624 and 1630. The font dates back to 13th century, during the 20th century a pinnacle crashed from the tower through the roof and severely damaged the font. The church is open from dawn till dusk everyday.

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All Saints Church - Nailstone

All Saints Church - Nailstone
The church s mostly of the early 14th century with the chancel being 13th century. Its massive tower and spire dominate the small village and countryside for miles around.

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St Edith’s Church - Orton on the Hill

St Edith’s Church - Orton on the Hill
St Edith’s Church, Orton on the Hill is situated 2 miles west of the A444 at Twycross.  It is a magnificent Grade 1 medieval church with original box pews and triple decker pulpit.  It has many restored features including text boards , alabaster carving , Bevington organ and a full peal of 6 bells.  There are kitchen and toilet facilites. The church isregularly open on Saturdays and Sundays from April to October and by arrangements with a keyholder during winter months.

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All Saints Church – Ratcliffe Culey

All Saints Church – Ratcliffe Culey
All Saints church has a 2* listing, dating from early 14th century, although a church is first mentioned in 1220 Metriculous of Bishop Hugh of Wells. The church today is largely as it would have originally appeared. William Pevsner’s ‘Buildings of England’ states that it is very unusual, being “a church of one build”, the only major addition being the raising of the rooflines in 1720’s by 60 cm Medleys of medieval stained glass fragments area located in the north and south chancel side windows and the east window is by Kempe, 1901.

There are 14th century sedilia in the chancel and a piscina in the nave south wall, evidence of a former chapel in this area. More recently George III royal coat of arms has been conserved and hung in the nave. A wall text with biblical passage from the period of the William Tyndale translation of the New Testament, 1534, has also been exposed and conserved.

The church is open every Friday 10.00am – 5.00pm otherwise the key is available form the church wardens.

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St Peter’s Church – Shackerstone

St Peter’s Church – Shackerstone
There has been a church dedicated to St Peter in Shackerstone since the beginning of 13th century. In 1416 the Church was acquired by the Augustine Order who were instrumental in the rebuilding of the church largely in its present form. In 1633 the oldest of the present three bells was installed followed by the Middle Bell in 1664. In 1845 Lord Howe rebuilt the south and north aisles, of the church, shortened the chancel by one bay and restored the nave, he also installed the present box pews and balcony. There are stained glass windows dedicated to those who lost their lives in the two world wars.

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Sheepy Magna

All Saints Church - Sheepy Magna
The present church in Sheepy Magna was rebuilt in 1778 and stands on the site of a much earlier building. There is documentary evidence to suggest that the earlier church probably predated 1150.

When the church was rebuilt it appears that the outline plan was close to the original building. The North aisle and a porch were added in 1859.

Amongst the treasures of All Saints; the jewels must be the Burne-Jones and Kempe stained glass windows.

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Shenton

St John the Evangelist, - Shenton
St John the Evangelist, was completed in 1861 on the site of a much older and more modest building, described as two aisles with a house roof. The current church was designed by the Rev H J Wollaston, whose family contributed substantially to the construction. The architect was W H Knight from Cheltenham.

The stone used is mainly Sydnope stone from Derbyshire dressed with Bath stone, although stone from the old church was used in the internal walls. The oak comes from Chedworth Wood in Gloucestershire and the slates from Colyweston in Northamptonshire. All the stonework and building was done by Haddons of Atherstone whilst the woodwork is the work of James William Sands, the Shenton estate carpenter.

The organ was donated by Mrs A Wollaston in 1887 to replace the harmonium. Repair work was required in 1875 whilst in 1879 the west wall of the tower was removed and rebuilt. Admiral Arburthnot, who was present at the Battle of Trafalgar and who married one of the Wollaston family’s daughters, is buried in the grounds.

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St Botolph’s Church - Sibson

St Botolph’s Church - Sibson
Sibson church is in the centre of the village, and dates from the 13th century at least. The nave is more recent having been rebuilt in the 18th century after the spire fell. The interior is light and airy, and contains some interesting tombs and brasses. [There is also a Victorian wheelchair and wheeled bier.] The organ is a good instrument which has recently been restored.

The tower contains a peal of 6 bells, having recently been augmented from 4, and attracts ringers from many areas. The east end has recently been underpinned to protect the structure from serious subsidence.

Further information about the church can be found in the porch. There is a monthly Communion service and other occasional services.

The church is usually open during daylight hours in the summer months. Keys are held by John Hobson (Churchwarden) Tel: 01827 880967 or Roger Moreton Tel: 01827 880586.

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St James’ Church - Sutton Cheney

St James’ Church - Sutton Cheney
The Church is situated in the proximity of the Battle of Bosworth – 1485 and displays a memorial plaque to Richard III and the fallen of Bosworth Field.  A church trail designed for children to use is available at the back of the church.  The church is open everyday.

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Twycross

St James' Chuch - Twycross
Although there must have been a church building in Twycross in King Henry's time, the building we see today dates back to c1330-1350. The Eastern window on the South wall of the nave has Y tracery, c1300-1350, but the bulk of the church is late 1300's. The chancel windows have transomes and pointed trefoil tracery. The North aisle has plain moulded piers and arches without capitals, which are of the decorated period of architecture (1301-1400)

The North side clerestory is 15th century. In 1840 the North aisle was elongated to house the box pews belonging to the Curzon family from Gopsall Hall and their staff. The cemented South porch also dates from this time.

Major additions were made to the church in 1840, funded, largely, by the first Earl Howe of Gopsall, Richard William Penn Curzon. who was Lord Chamberlain to Queen Adelaide, at one time.

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